Access Control Installation Ohio - A Good Business Investment

Whether you are looking for security for commercial, residential or hospitality sectors, card access control systems can be an excellent method of ensuring that your property remains safe and secure. This type of system also enables you to restrict, monitor and modify access to the areas that need to be secured.

If you have stayed in a hotel, you are likely familiar with this type of system.  You are given an access card which allows you to enter certain areas, and the card has a limited activation period.  Hotels also use these cards for their employees, allowing management, housekeepers and maintenance to access specific areas on the property.  Hospitality sector usage is the most common for card access control systems, but they also have much farther reaching applicability.

 

Access Control Card Reader

 

Card access control systems can be used in any business where an area needs to be kept secured.  Whether you have an inventory room or area that contains valuable items or sensitive data, or a server room with computer equipment that needs to have limited access, a card access control system would be perfect for your needs.  These types of systems work much more efficiently than a key-based system due to a few factors:

  • Keys can be lost or duplicated
  • The cost of replacing an entire lock mechanism when keys are put into the wrong hands is far greater than deactivating an access card
  • If you need to restrict someone’s access you can do so by deactivating their card without having to have the card in your possession.

At the basic level, card access control systems can allow card-carrying personnel to unlock a door and gain entry to a certain area.  In more complex systems, a card can be programmed to allow entry through specific doors or into specific areas or permit entry only during certain times.  Data about who has which card and what type of access that person’s card has is also available via the controller, which – via connection to the card readers located at points of entry or access – signals the door to permit entry or not.

With software programs on complex systems, card carriers can be added or removed, access schedules or which areas personnel are allowed to enter and other facets of manipulating permissions or points-of-entry can be performed easily by the system operator.  Additionally, the software can be used to provide monitoring of point-of-entry access activity both historically and in real-time.  This allows you to know who is going where and when, for all secured doors and entry points at your facility or on your property.

With all that in mind, here are five things to keep in mind before you install a card access control system at your property or facility:

  • What type of access do you want to provide or what type of security do you require?
  • Will all personnel have access to areas that are secured by card readers?
  • What type of investment are you willing to make to ensure security?
  • Do you want additional levels of security for some areas (i.e., keypad code entry)?
  • Do you have a plan in mind for the hierarchy of access for personnel and points-of-entry?

It is best to contact Shoreworx Communications at (440) 808-8448 to schedule a FREE site survey to install a new access control system.

Your data is your business. Security is ours.

Let the experts at Shoreworx manage and secure your network so you can focus on your core business applications. Our services include:

  • State-of-the-art security infrastructure and technology
  • Monitoring by security experts 24x7x365 to ensure ongoing availability of your applications
  • In addition to our comprehensive suite of services, you can trust that our enterprise-grade data centers will provide a safe, reliable, always-on environment

Here’s how Shoreworx security services protect your organization:

Managed Network Security

Managed Firewall Services

Our Managed Firewall services are powered by an award winning, industry-leading firewall solution. Supporting multiple security zones, we provide onsite monitoring, VPN availability, security policy audits, firewall patching and updates, network address translation, and onsite hardware sparing in the event of a failure.

Intrusion Detection/Prevention Services

Shoreworx’s high-speed Intrusion Detection/Prevention service continually scans for anomalous, inappropriate, and unauthorized access attempts at the edge of your network. Our IDPS offering captures and inspects all network traffic, sending you email alerts when there’s danger, and alerting Shoreworx’s NOC in the event of an escalation.

Managed Perimeter Service

A combination of Intrusion Detection/Prevention, VPN, and Firewall services, the Managed Perimeter Service protects your network against external attacks, stops unauthorized access to protect against worms, trojans, and other malicious data from entering and taking down your network. Fully monitored by Shoreworx experts 24x7x365, you can rest assured that your network is protected.

Data Systems Security

Anti-Malware Agent

Our Anti-Malware Agent software works in the background on your server, detecting malicious code, anti-spyware, phishing attempts, viruses, and other malignant technologies attempting to gain control of your systems. With our service you’ll reduce the risk of exploits to your systems.

Log Management Services

Keeping a record of network and systems activity is easy with Shoreworx’s Log Management Service. We consolidate and organize up to a year’s worth of log events from network devices and systems, providing detailed insight into the health of your individual devices and common infrastructure in real-time.

File and Database Integrity Verification

Risk prevention is at the core of our File and Database Integrity Verification service, which protects critical IT configurations by aligning them with access and security best practices and policies. We mix integrity monitoring with comprehensive compliance and network security policy management allowing you to perform a full forensic analysis on your systems and data and comb through a complete audit trail.

Managed Global Directory Authentication Service

Through our Managed Global Directory Authentication service, you’ll have named user credentials to give you access into your systems, as opposed to providing general access to users. By giving each user an individual logon, you’ll be shoring up the integrity of your system’s security. As an added benefit, we provide an audit trail so that you can see who did what and when within your environment.

Shoreworx recently installed a 24 Strand Fiber Optic Link between two of the Municipal Buildings in University Heights. The city came to us and needed a solution to cut their Utility expenses. Shoreworx proposed a new high speed fiber optic link from their head end building, to this remote location a few blocks away. By connecting these two locations with fiber from pole to pole, we were able to reduce their overall monthly Phone/Internet bill by half.

Call Shoreworx today and let us know how we can help you with your next fiber optic cabling project. We can install all types of fiber, including Outside Plant, Backbone Fiber, Data Center Connections, Carrier Connections and much more. Our in house Fiber Optic experience is extremely rich with talent.

440-808-8448

www.shoreworx.com

clevleand IT cablingtop-ratedShoreworx Communications is a top installer of network cables in the Cleveland area, as well as the rest of Ohio, Western Pennsylvania and Eastern Michigan. We have a strong reputation for being reliable, knowledgeable and having competitive pricing. Our team of technicians are up to date on all technological advances and are eager to learn more as information becomes available, keeping us in the know for your needs. We take great pride in our work and will assist you with a variety of your business needs. Our services include:

  • Structured Network Cabling, Category 5e, 6, and 7, De-mark extensions, A/V Cabling etc.
  • Installation, repair and troubleshooting of all POTS lines and customer networks
  • VOIP installation services
  • CPE Installation services
  • Complete Wiring and Network Room Demolition Services available with certification
  • Equipment removal and Asset Liquidation Services
  • Phone Closet and complete Data Center remediation, inventory and clean-ups
  • Fiber optic cabling, termination, splicing, testing, troubleshooting, and repair
  • Audio/Video and paging systems
  • Conference room solutions
  • CCTV/IP/Analog Surveillance Systems (Axis Partner and Authorized Reseller)
  • Access Control/Biometric Solutions
  • WLAN and Wi-Fi surveys, design, installation, troubleshooting and repair. We own our own Fluke AirCheck, Air Magnet Survey Pro Software and equipment.
  • Data Center/Server Room planning, design, build, commissioning, test and turn-up. This includes the installation of raised access flooring, HVAC, UPS, fire suppression, security, and monitoring platforms such as Environet and Falcon.
  • Collocation and TELCO Installation Services, DSX Panels, Ladder Rack, Grounding Systems, Nortel S/DMS/Tellabs/Lucent 5eSS installation and implementation
  • Internet access Services/1.5Mbps/3Mbps/5Mbps/10Mbps/20Mbps/100Mbps/Gigabit Rates available
  • AC/DC Electrical Services
  • Data Center and critical infrastructure security cages and rooms.
  • Project Management Services, we have managed national roll outs and installations for some of our larger clients
  • Rack and Stack services, OEM, Network Engineering Services
  • Data Center Relocation Services, Planning, Project Management, Big Box, Small Move, Etc.

Call Shoreworx today to schedule your free site survey! We cannot wait to hear from you! 440-808-8448

Cleveland Skyline

WireCrafters-Server-Security-and-Colocation-Cage-customized-to-fit-around-existing-building-structures

Fastenal DC PP rear

cleveland cabling experts

 

Our services are typically phased as follows:

Data Center relocations are expensive and require specific expertise and experience. Therefore, we recommend completing these tasks using only skilled personnel who are familiar with IT migrations. Shoreworx Communications fully specifies and implements all elements of the relocation program. Specific activities include:

    • Project Management. Detailed project schedule, team structure, Shoreworx, and Client Requirements are developed. Comprehensive communications across all partners including client, Shoreworx, landlord (if applicable), and other subcontractors are completed by Shoreworx project management personnel as preparation for onsite work is completed.
    • Pre-Move Site Preparation. Shoreworx relocation professionals arrive onsite and perform a pre-move assessment of all infrastructure to verify size, count, physical layout, packing requirements, labeling of all devices, cables, and equipment with specific information for new rack location, position, and integration requirements, path for transport from the facility, risk mitigation, cabling requirements, and other facility and IT requirements.
  • Move Plan Creation. Shoreworx will develop and deliver a complete Move Plan specifying all aspects of the Computer Room Relocation program including labeling, de-installation, packing, transport, unloading, unpacking, re-installation, re-cabling (if separately contracted to do so), re-certification of equipment per the OEM (if optionally contracted to do so), documentation, clean-up, and other miscellaneous tasks associated with the relocation.
  • Move Implementation. Shoreworx personnel perform all de-installation, packing, loading, transporting, unloading, re-installation, and recertification of equipment per the Original Equipment Manufacturer.
  • Post-Move Consulting. Project completion activities including punch list completion, move review, documentation, customer hand off and clean-up.

Each of our computer relocating and data center migration solutions is customizable to your specific needs and budget bringing you in on time and budget!

Ethernet Cable

Anyone who has plugged their computer into a broadband Internet connection such as cable or DSL has used an Ethernet cable. Ethernet cables are the standard cables commonly used to connect a modem to a router, and, likewise, to connect a router to a computer’s network interface card (NIC). These thick, flexible cables are all practically indistinguishable to the untrained eye, but not all Ethernet cables are the same.

The Major Categories of Ethernet Cables

Ethernet cables have been evolving since the beginning of the Ethernet standard in 1985. Many different categories of Ethernet cable have been developed, and each category has different specifications as far as shielding from electromagnetic interference, data transmission speed, and the possible bandwidth frequency range required to achieve that speed. It is understandable that some confusion can arise when looking at all the available options for Ethernet cabling. Luckily, the category of cable is usually clearly printed on the cable’s sheath, so there can be no doubt as to the type of cable being used. There are also certain types of cables recognized as common industry standards. This guide will describe a few of the most common categories of Ethernet cable that are used in modern networks.

Category 3

Category 3 Ethernet cable, also known as Cat 3 or station wire, is one of the oldest forms of Ethernet cable still in use today. It is an unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable that is capable of carrying 10 megabits per second (Mbps) of data or voice transmissions. Its maximum possible bandwidth is 16 MHz. Cat 3 cable reached the peak of its popularity in the early 1990s, as it was then the industry standard for computer networks. With the debut of the faster Category 5 cable, however, Cat 3 fell out of favor. It still can be seen in use in two-line telephone systems and older 10BASE-T Ethernet installations.

Category 5

Category 5 (Cat 5) Ethernet cable is the successor to the earlier Category 3. Like Cat 3, it is a UTP cable, but it is able to carry data at a higher transfer rate. Cat 5 cables introduced the 10/100Mbps speed to the Ethernet, which means that the cables can support either 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps speeds. A 100 Mbps speed is also known as Fast Ethernet, and Cat 5 cables were the first Fast Ethernet-capable cables to be introduced. They also can be used for telephone signals and video, in addition to Ethernet data. This category has been superseded by the newer Category 5e cables.

Category 5e

The Category 5e standard is an enhanced version of Cat 5 cable, which is optimized to reduce crosstalk, or the unwanted transmission of signals between data channels. This category works for 10/100 Mbps and 1000 Mbps (Gigabit) Ethernet, and it has become the most widely used category of Ethernet cable available on the market. While Cat 5 is common in existing installations, Cat 5e has completely replaced it in new installations. While both Cat 5 and Cat 5e cables contain four twisted pairs of wires, Cat 5 only utilizes two of these pairs for Fast Ethernet, while Cat 5e uses all four, enabling Gigabit Ethernet speeds. Bandwidth is also increased with Cat 5e cables, which can support a maximum bandwidth of 100 MHz. Cat 5e cables are backward compatible with Cat 5 cables, and can be used in any modern network installation.

Category 6

One of the major differences between Category 5e and the newer Category 6 is in transmission performance. While Cat 5e cables can handle Gigabit Ethernet speeds, Cat 6 cables are certified to handle Gigabit Ethernet with a bandwidth of up to 250 MHz. Cat 6 cables have several improvements, including better insulation and thinner wires, that provide a higher signal-to-noise ratio, and are better suited for environments in which there may be higher electromagnetic interference. Some Cat 6 cables are available in shielded twisted pair (STP) forms or UTP forms. However, for most applications, Cat 5e cable is adequate for gigabit Ethernet, and it is much less expensive than Cat 6 cable. Cat 6 cable is also backwards compatible with Cat 5 and 5e cables.

Category 6a

Category 6 a cable, or augmented Category 6 cable, improves upon the basic Cat 6 cable by allowing 10,000 Mbps data transmission rates and effectively doubling the maximum bandwidth to 500 MHz. Category 6a cables are usually available in STP form, and, as a result, must have specialized connectors that ground the cable.

Category 7

Category 7 cable, also known as Class F, is a fully shielded cable that supports speeds of up to 10 Gbps (10,000 Mbps) and bandwidths of up to 600 Mhz. Cat 7 cables consist of a screened, shielded twisted pair (SSTP) of wires, and the layers of insulation and shielding contained within them are even more extensive than that of Cat 6 cables. Because of this shielding, they are thicker, more bulky, and more difficult to bend. Additionally, each of the shielding layers must be grounded, or else performance may be reduced to the point that there will be no improvement over Cat 6, and performance may be worse than Cat 5. For this reason, it’s very important to understand the type of connectors at the ends of a Cat 7 cable.

With each successive category, there has been an increase in data transmission speed and bandwidth. To fully future-proof a network installation, the highest categories are recommended, but only if all of the other equipment on the network is capable of similar speeds. Otherwise, expensive cables will be only as fast as the slowest piece of hardware on the network.

Ethernet Cable Connectors

The ends of Ethernet cables that connect into a NIC, router, or other network device are known by several names. Modular connector, jack, or plug are the most commonly used terms. Shorter lengths of Ethernet cable are usually sold with the connectors already installed, but for custom installations requiring longer lengths, cable is often sold in bulk quantities, and connectors must be installed on the ends.

The most common type of connector for Ethernet installations is referred to as an “RJ-45″ connector. It is officially known as an 8P8C connector, but this term is rarely used in the field, and the term “RJ-45,” which was the telephone industry’s term for this connector’s wiring pattern, has become the customary colloquial name for the connector itself. Categories 3 through 6 all use the RJ-45 connector, but Cat 7 utilizes a specialized version of the RJ-45 called the GigaGate45 (GG45), which grounds the cable and allows for higher data transmission rates. There are two standard pin assignment configurations for RJ-45 connectors: T568A and T568B. The T568A standard is typically used in home applications, while T568B is used in business applications.

In every case, the specifications of the cable, such as its category, whether or not it is shielded, and whether or not it needs to be grounded, must match the specifications of the connector. For those who are confused or uncertain about crimping and installing connectors to cables manually, it is best to buy cables that already have connectors professionally installed.

Other Qualities of Ethernet Cables to Consider

There are a few important considerations that apply to all Ethernet cables. Data transmission rate and bandwidth both decrease with the increase of cable length, so the shorter the length, the better. For 10/100/1000BASE-T networks (those that have maximum speeds of 10, 100, or 1000 Mbps, including all the aforementioned cable types except for Categories 6a and 7), 100 meters is the maximum allowable cable length before the signal will degrade. For category 6a cables running at 10 Gbps speeds, 55 meters is the maximum allowable length, and even this length is only allowed in very good alien crosstalk conditions, or areas of low interference, such as when the cable is located far away from other cables that could cause interference.

There are some other terms regarding cable terminations that can complicate the shopping experience. Some cables are referred to as patch cables, while others are called crossover cables. Even though crossover and patch cables may look the same, they function differently. A patch cable is one that terminates with the same type of connector standard at both ends. The connectors terminating a patch cable can use the T568A or T568B standards, but both ends must be the same. A crossover cable, on the other hand, has one end that terminates in a T568A connector and another that terminates in a T568B connector. Patch cables are used to connect devices that are different from one another, such as a switch and a computer. Crossover cables are used to connect similar devices, as when a switch is connected to another switch, for example.

Another important distinction in Ethernet cables is whether they contain solid or stranded conductors. Solid conductor cables have one solid wire per conductor, while stranded conductor cables have several strands of wire (typically seven) wrapped around each other to form a single conductor. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages. Solid conductor cables are best for fixed wires within the walls or structure of a building. The single conductors are sturdy enough to be punched down into wall jacks and patch panels, but not as easy to install into a typical RJ-45 connector. Stranded conductors, on the other hand, can fray when punched down into wall jacks, so they are better suited to be crimped into an RJ-45 connector. They are also more flexible and forgiving when bent at sharp angles, so they are better suited for patch cables and applications where the cable may be rolled up or otherwise moved around.

Conclusion

When you’re setting up an Internet connection in your home or office, you’ll need to obtain the proper Ethernet cable to attach your computer to the modem. While connecting the cable is typically a simple task, finding the right one may be a bit more complex. While Ethernet cables may all look similar to one another, their specifications vary widely. It’s important to research what type of cable will work with your equipment, and you’ll also want to consider things like the price and quality of the cable, as well as the types and number of devices you’ll be connecting to your network. You could go for a cheap, industry standard solution such as Cat 5e cable or future-proof your network by opting for a Cat 7 cable. If you’re looking to connect one switch to another or bypass a router, maybe crossover cables are the solution, or maybe you need a lot of patch cables to connect more devices to your network. In any case, you’ll also want to ensure you’re purchasing the right length of Ethernet cable, and properly addressing any interference concerns. Here at Shoreworx, we specialize in getting your system up and running with the proper cables and related equipment. Please do not hesitate to contact us at (440) 808-8448 to schedule your free site survey so that we can establish the best equipment that you will need for your project.

Fiber optic cable is one of the fastest-growing transmission mediums for both new cabling installations and upgrades, including backbone, horizontal, and even desktop applications. Fiber offers a number of advantages over copper.

Cost

The cost for fiber cable, components, and hardware is steadily decreasing. Installation costs for fiber are higher than copper because of the skill needed for terminations. Overall, fiber is more expensive than copper in the short run, but it may actually be less expensive in the long run. Fiber typically costs less to maintain, has less much less downtime, and requires less networking hardware. And fiber eliminates the need to recable for higher network performance.

 Low attenuation and greater distance

Because the fiber optic signal is made of light, very little signal loss occurs during transmission, and data can move at higher speeds and greater distances. Fiber does not have the 100-meter (9328-ft.) distance limitation of unshielded twisted pair copper (without a booster). Fiber distances can range from 300 meters (984.2 ft.) to 40 kilometers (24.8 mi.), depending on the style of cable, wavelength, and network. Because fiber signals need less boosting than copper ones do, the cable performs better.

Security

Your data is safe with fiber cable. It doesn’t radiate signals and is extremely difficult to tap. If the cable is tapped, it’s very easy to monitor because the cable leaks light, causing the entire system to fail. If an attempt is made to break the physical security of your fiber system, you’ll know it.

Fiber networks also enable you to put all your electronics and hardware in one central location, instead of having wiring closets with equipment throughout the building.

Greater bandwidth

Fiber provides far greater bandwidth than copper and has standardized performance up to 10 Gbps. While not currently a standard, these speeds could become a reality in future proposals and ratifications. Keep in mind that fiber speeds are dependent on the type of cable used. Single-mode cable offers far greater distance than either 62.5- or 50-micron multimode cable. In addition, fiber optic cable can carry more information with greater fidelity than copper wire. That’s why telephone and CATV companies are converting to fiber.

Immunity and reliability

Fiber provides extremely reliable data transmission. It’s completely immune to many environmental factors that affect copper cable. The core is made of glass, which is an insulator, so no electric current can flow through. It’s immune to electrometric interference and radio-frequency interference (EM/RFI), crosstalk, impedance problems, and more. You can run fiber cable next to industrial equipment without worry. Fiber is also less susceptible to temperature fluctuations than copper and can be submerged in water.

Design

Fiber is lightweight, thin, and more durable than copper cable. Plus, fiber optic cable has pulling specifications that are up to 10 times greater than copper cable’s. Its small size makes it easier to handle, and it takes up much less space in cabling ducts. Although fiber is still more difficult to terminate than copper, advancements in connectors are making termination easier. In addition, fiber is actually easier to test than copper cable.

 Migration

The proliferation and lower costs of media converters are making copper to fiber migration much easier. The converters provide seamless links and enable the use of existing hardware. Fiber can be incorporated into network in planned upgrades.

Standards

TIA/EIA-785, ratified in 2001, provides a cost-effective migration path from 10-Mbps Ethernet to 100-Mbps Fast Ethernet over fiber (100BASE-SX). An addendum to the standard eliminates limitations in transceiver designs. In addition, in June 2002, the IEEE approved a 10-Gigabit Ethernet (10-GbE) standard.

There are many more advantages to Fiber optics. Shoreworx technicians can meet with you on site to discuss your needs and explain why Fiber is the wave of the future. Call us today! 440-808-8448

Cleveland’s Top Network Cabling Company

clevleand IT cablingtop-ratedShoreworx Communications is a top installer of network cables in the Cleveland area, as well as the rest of Ohio, Western Pennsylvania and Eastern Michigan. We have a strong reputation for being reliable, knowledgeable and having competitive pricing. Our team of technicians are up to date on all technological advances and are eager to learn more as information becomes available, keeping us in the know for your needs. We take great pride in our work and will assist you with a variety of your business needs. Our services include:

  • Structured Network Cabling, Category 5e, 6, and 7, De-mark extensions, A/V Cabling etc.
  • Installation, repair and troubleshooting of all POTS lines and customer networks
  • VOIP installation services
  • CPE Installation services
  • Complete Wiring and Network Room Demolition Services available with certification
  • Equipment removal and Asset Liquidation Services
  • Phone Closet and complete Data Center remediation, inventory and clean-ups
  • Fiber optic cabling, termination, splicing, testing, troubleshooting, and repair
  • Audio/Video and paging systems
  • Conference room solutions
  • CCTV/IP/Analog Surveillance Systems (Axis Partner and Authorized Reseller)
  • Access Control/Biometric Solutions
  • WLAN and Wi-Fi surveys, design, installation, troubleshooting and repair. We own our own Fluke AirCheck, Air Magnet Survey Pro Software and equipment.
  • Data Center/Server Room planning, design, build, commissioning, test and turn-up. This includes the installation of raised access flooring, HVAC, UPS, fire suppression, security, and monitoring platforms such as Environet and Falcon.
  • Collocation and TELCO Installation Services, DSX Panels, Ladder Rack, Grounding Systems, Nortel S/DMS/Tellabs/Lucent 5eSS installation and implementation
  • Internet access Services/1.5Mbps/3Mbps/5Mbps/10Mbps/20Mbps/100Mbps/Gigabit Rates available
  • AC/DC Electrical Services
  • Data Center and critical infrastructure security cages and rooms.
  • Project Management Services, we have managed national roll outs and installations for some of our larger clients
  • Rack and Stack services, OEM, Network Engineering Services
  • Data Center Relocation Services, Planning, Project Management, Big Box, Small Move, Etc.

Call Shoreworx today to schedule your free site survey! We cannot wait to hear from you! 440-808-8448

If your business still uses 10-year-old networking equipment, we have a simple solution: a complete upgrade of your structured cabling. Remember a time when 56 kbps dial-up Internet was cutting edge technology, but around the turn of the century, broadband connections, like DSL and cable, started to spring up.

Connectivity

Copper telephone lines used to be sufficient for basic phone calls and Internet browsing. Nobody needs a fast Internet connection to read emails or send text documents. Times have changed, several :

  • Streaming Internet radio and videos
  • Teleconferencing
  • Transferring 100 MB and larger files

All of these tasks require significantly more bandwidth, and your old hardware will eventually impact your bottom line. If employees cannot access the information they need, productivity will adversely affected. Shoreworx Communications offers a full range of structured cabling options. Our experts will inspect your current infrastructure and make recommendations based on your current bandwidth needs, and many of our customers decide to upgrade their electrical and structured cabling at the same time to minimize costs.

Voice Communications

Nothing beats good old fashioned telephones for communicating with clients and coworkers. Shoreworx Communications will install or upgrade telephone systems. We can also help you configure VoIP solutions that let you communicate over your Internet connection instead of a dedicated telephone line. You will still have a phone number, and in most respects, your phone experience will be identical to a conventional phone service but with the added benefits of increased flexibility, mobility, and productivity.

Data

More bandwidth is required for the constant evolution of technology. As you hire additional employees and upgrade your computers, you will quickly find that your aging network can no longer handle the increased load. To bring your LAN (Local Area Network) up to speed.

  • Cat 6, Cat6e
  • Fiber optics
  • HDMI

phone: 440-808-8448

email: service@shoreworx.com

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When it comes to your network, good cabling is a top priority! IT professionals tend to choose fiber optic cabling rather than copper. While copper is a fantastic option, the price being one of them, some will invest in the benefits of fiber. We have listed a few of the reasons below:

1.) Fiber optic cables will last longer than copper

Fiber optic is made from glass, however will not break as copper does. You will have to replace the wiring less often.

2.) There is less attenuation in fiber optic transmissions

Attenuation is due to power loss as a signal is transmitted over a long distance. Copper can transmit information only 9,328ft. Fiber optic cables can travel between 984.2ft to 24.8 miles. This will ensure the information gets to where it needs to go without worry.

3.) Electromagnetic interference will not be an issue with fiber optic cables

Unlike copper cables, fiber does not conduct electricity, therefore, no electromagnetic interfere. Copper cable, on the other hand, can cause major problems with your network in the event it was not installed correctly or comes loose at any point.

4.) Fiber optic cables do not pose a fire hazard

As mentioned above, no electricity flows through the core of fiber optic cables. You can have peace of mind by not having to worry about them catching fire.

5.) Fiber optic cabling transmits very fast!

Fiber optic cables run very very fast. Almost at the speed of light. Pretty impressive and a great way to do business. You need things done quickly in today’s business world. Sometimes your project may depend on it. Fiber will deliver much faster than copper, which can help you get your job done faster and more efficiently.

We hope this has been informative for you. Please do not hesitate to contact us with any questions you have or if you want to set up a free site survey for us to come out and meet with you. We will discuss your requirements and the options that you can have. Our knowledgeable team will help you understand why it works in order for you to make a sound decision.

Call Shoreworx today! 440-808-8448